rahimk:

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Palestinians in Nabi Saleh protest with images of Nelson Mandela. July, 2013

In today’s edition of the Daily Bruin you can read wonderful interviews with Professors at UCLA who were a part of the 1970s and 1980s struggle against apartheid in South Africa. Apartheid is the term…

By Chris McGreal at The Guardian

Israel was openly critical of apartheid through the 1950s and 60s as it built alliances with post-colonial African governments. But most African states broke ties after the 1973 Yom Kippur war and the government in Jerusalem began to take a more benign view of the isolated regime in Pretoria. The relationship changed so profoundly that, in 1976, Israel invited the South African prime minister, John Vorster - a former Nazi sympathiser and a commander of the fascist Ossewabrandwag that sided with Hitler - to make a state visit.

Leaving unmentioned Vorster’s wartime internment for supporting Germany, Israel’s prime minister, Yitzhak Rabin, hailed the South African premier as a force for freedom and made no mention of Vorster’s past as he toured the Jerusalem memorial to the six million Jews murdered by the Nazis. At a state banquet, Rabin toasted “the ideals shared by Israel and South Africa: the hopes for justice and peaceful coexistence”. Both countries, he said, faced “foreign-inspired instability and recklessness”.

Vorster, whose army was then overrunning Angola, told his hosts that South Africa and Israel were victims of the enemies of western civilisation. A few months later, the South African government’s yearbook characterised the two countries as confronting a single problem: “Israel and South Africa have one thing above all else in common: they are both situated in a predominantly hostile world inhabited by dark peoples.”

Vorster’s visit laid the ground for a collaboration that transformed the Israel-South Africa axis into a leading weapons developer and a force in the international arms trade. Liel, who headed the Israeli foreign ministry’s South Africa desk in the 80s, says that the Israeli security establishment came to believe that the Jewish state may not have survived without the relationship with the Afrikaners.

"We created the South African arms industry," says Liel. "They assisted us to develop all kinds of technology because they had a lot of money. When we were developing things together we usually gave the know-how and they gave the money. After 1976, there was a love affair between the security establishments of the two countries and their armies.

"We were involved in Angola as consultants to the [South African] army. You had Israeli officers there cooperating with the army. The link was very intimate."

Alongside the state-owned factories turning out materiel for South Africa was Kibbutz Beit Alfa, which developed a profitable industry selling anti-riot vehicles for use against protesters in the black townships.

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(Source: fajrarmy, via lensofconscience)

today marks the release of our friend and collaborator ghoul abdul’s second beat tape, surface breaks. it is really something special.
name-your-price to download, $5 cassette (limited to 50).

Thuggee Cult gets quoted in Lakshmi Gandhi’s recent article for NPR digging through the etymology of our namesake.

Tags: thuggeecult

Peep this EP it goes hard.

arabiannightsonmymind:

Fairouz playing guitar.

arabiannightsonmymind:

Fairouz playing guitar.

(via muslimrave)

SAID IS DEAD. LONG LIVE SAID!

Esmat Elhalaby goes in:

"Thuggee Cult was never supposed to happen. Thuggee Cult would have never happened if it wasn’t for the writings or the countless Youtube clips of Edward Said. Thuggee Cult would have never happened if we weren’t convinced that going to school and going about your business and not causing any trouble wasn’t just tragic, but unacceptable."

Plus moving tributes from Sumayya Kassamali, Martin Espada, Robyn Spencer, Daisy Rockwell, Anjali Kamat, Shahnaz Rouse, Chee Malabar, and Snehal Shingavi in honor of the late Edward W. Said.

Tags: Edward Said

Peep this amazing zine.
Also, Eid Mubarak to our Muslim friends.

Thuggee Cult’s “Can the Subaltern Freak?" was partially recorded on a UCLA University Apartments couch which may or may not have been made in an American prison, though in our imaginations we were sitting on faintly glowing misshapen things like the one in which we see Immanuel Wallerstein on this tumblr.

Drinking the Kool-Aid of Thuggee Cult

mishthi:

By Guest Blogger Neelanjana Banerjee

When I moved to Los Angeles after living in San Francisco for ten years, I was expecting the usual stereotypes—that I’d get bored listening to stories about entertainment industry fallout, and occasionally see James Franco at brunch. [Okay, that second thing does happen sometimes. All right, all right: once.] But in reality, I have found myself surrounded by mainly activists, artists, and most surprisingly: academics. If you told me before I moved to LA, that I would meet a large number of cutting-edge POC theoreticians, I would have laughed at the irony—especially after moving away from the shadow of Berkeley and Stanford. But here I am in Los Angeles, more wowed by the academic rock stars that I meet than by the real rock stars I may be standing in line for coffee behind.

 I say this as an intro to Thuggee Cult’s Beats for Bangladesh track because it represents that smart, sly, subversive academic kool that I’ve come to respect LA for. Not that I know anything about the mysterious cats behind Thuggee Cult—self-described cryptically as: a “a Los Angeles-based music group with beginnings and endings elsewhere” featuring Jung John Brown, Saladin, Tripoli, Iskandir, Radio Rahim and produced by Gameli. And the band’s name? Well, it is a historical reference to the name of the infamous tourist killing thugsters in India during the Sepoy Mutiny era.

 But their #B4B track “Thomas Friedman and the Orientalist Express” which is a jazzy mash-up of beats and samples, with some smooth flows running over it all, is both incredibly listenable and drops some smart make-you-stop lyrics like “white savior complexes” and “fuck a Slumdog Millionaire”; and maybe the most relevant to this album: “This shit is 2013 slavery / peoples dying for your ambercrombie.” [It’s pretty amazing how well slavery and Abercrombie rhymes, isn’t it?]

Read More


Shouts to Neelanjana Banerjee and Mishthi Music.
Check out http://www.beatsforbangladesh.org/

bloglikeanegyptian:

so a couple of weeks ago i uploaded a comic about a hijabi superhero. i received a pretty fantastic response so i’ve tried to develop it a little further.

so here’s part two - this time featuring FEMEN, my all-time favorite white feminists whose specialty is talking over muslim women.

PS. her name is Qahera.

DEAR FRIENDS, 

"BEATS FOR BANGLADESH: A BENEFIT ALBUM IN SOLIDARITY WITH THE GARMENT WORKERS OF RANA PLAZA" HAS JUST BEEN RELEASED. 

THUGGEE CULT IS PROUD TO ANNOUNCE THAT OUR NEWEST TRACK “THOMAS FRIEDMAN ON THE ORIENTALIST EXPRESS” IS ON THE ALBUM. (NOT TO MENTION SONGS FROM THE KOMINAS, THE VIJAY IYER TRIO, CHEE MALABAR & MORE)

AND BIG SHOUTS TO BROOKLYN SHANTI & TAZ AHMED WHO PUT THIS ALL TOGETHER. 

PLZ BUY IT NOW THX.

UNTIL VICTORY, 

THUGGEE CULT

friend and sometimes collaborator of thuggee cult, ghoul abdul. peep his most recent ep “I met my mind today”.

Thuggee Cult’s producer just released his first solo record of experimental pop. Stream it here: https://soundcloud.com/gameli-music-and-noise/sets/teach-us-to-outgrow-our

Download link is below.


gamelimusic
:

TEACH US TO OUTGROW OUR MADNESS

This record documents my involuntary confrontations with other ways of knowing and being. It is for those who bear a little chaos in their hearts. The title is from a short story by Kenzaburo Oe. Download it for free: 

http://www.mediafire.com/download/rxgr89xsqmptc90/Teach_Us_To_Outgrow_Our_Madness.zip

Please repost if you like it. Thank you!

(via bildochdialektik)

reigningblog:

Hailing from Los Angeles, Yourself In Peace demonstrate a somewhat unique blend of textured fuzz and stark, minimalist beats that remains sumptuous and engrossing enough that it can slip seamlessly into the subconscious, flooding the mind with a much welcomed warmth. With latest E.P